WE ARE LOCATED IN A LEED CERTIFIED BUILDING. BUT, WHAT IS LEED?

Leed

LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is changing the way we think about how buildings and communities are planned, constructed, maintained and operated. Leaders around the world have made LEED the most widely used third-party verification for green buildings, with around 1.85 million square feet being certified daily.

LEED works for all buildings—from homes to corporate headquarters—at all phases of development. Projects pursuing LEED certification earn points across several areas that address sustainability issues. Based on the number of points achieved, a project then receives one of four LEED rating levels: Certified, Silver, Gold and Platinum.

LEED-certified buildings are resource efficient. They use less water and energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As an added bonus, they save money.

All buildings in. LEED is flexible enough to apply to all project types.

LEED was developed to address all buildings everywhere, regardless of where they are in their life cycle. From hospitals to data centers, from historical buildings to those still in the design phase, there is a LEED for every building.

LEED is pushing the green building industry further.

The LEED certification process is designed to inspire project teams to seek innovative solutions that are better for our environment and better for our communities.

Here’s how to get started.

  • Select a rating system for your project, and learn basic program requirement
  • Review our series of LEED certification guides
  • Decide which credits your project should pursue
  • Equip your project with the right tools

Credit: usgbc.org